Category Archives: Soul/funk

Agalloch - The Mantle (CD, Album)

At the same time, I was really into post-rock, so I was kind of curious about mixing early Ulver with Mogwai and seeing what happens with that, and that was sort of the beginning of it. Once Raph joined the project, he added his influences into it, and we were getting more into progressive and black metal and these kinds of things evolved, and then Evan joined, and he put his spirit into it.

I think it was mostly European music to begin with. So, yeah, I think it has just come about very naturally. Album) those listening or reading, can you tell them what chamber folk is and how it has influenced you guys as musicians? And we are exactly that, right? But I think having a guitar lends itself more to that folk style.

I mean, to be able to describe it in a more general way, it would be harder, just because everyone has their own take on it, and I think that groups that play that type of music do it differently. It feels like a distant relative within a bustling town, as opposed to Musk Ox, which resides in the wilderness. Nathanael: Yeah, the history goes back even before that, because when I started doing Musk Ox demos, I was playing with Evan in this project called the Butternuts.

Evan: The Butternuts started, I guess it was back inand me and Nathanael and a harmonica player used to get together and perform in little bars late at night, and it was a lot of fun. The project only lasted for about a year, but from there, Nathanael connected with Daniel, who we used to know from university, and they started jamming together and they invited me to a session, and we used some of the Butternut songs that we had because they fit so well into that heavier kind of setting.

I had an electric violin that I took out, and it all came together and formed what would become The Night Watch. Nathanael: Yeah, and at first — for the history — when I was recording the first Musk Ox record, that same summer myself and Evan and our friend Miles who plays harmonica, we were recording the Butternuts album, which was sort of like chamber folk but with more jazz and blues. So like Evan was saying, that spawned The Night Watch.

And in Ottawa specifically, hip hop is big right now. A couple of decades ago, I feel like in the noughties metal was big here, but now I feel like metal has really subsided. I think we try to exist independently of the place where we live. Montreal has Constellation Records and Godspeed You! I think like you were asking about scenes, and what we sort of hinted at earlier, is that you know for me, this scene is us.

Okay, so now we can like them? I think the important thing is longevity. Some people might, for example, get signed early on and they have a lot of opportunities coming to them, but where are they in 20 years? You know, you must ask those questions. Evan: I agree. You play small venues where you get a handful of people coming out, and where you can make a handful of fans, but mostly people come out here for the Blues Festival.

You see thousands of people coming out for that. But like Raph was saying, hip hop has become very popular amongst the youth, and you see that reflected in the bands that perform at Blues Fest and so forth. Nathanael: Yeah, I think it is. And that means something to us, because when you spend as much time as you do on albums — like on our latest album, it took several years to finally get it all completed, and you have to really care about something like that to see it through all the way.

Evan: Well, it was just a coincidence my mom signed me up for violin lessons, and I just took to it and discovered I had an appreciation for the music; I had a talent for it, so I followed it. I pursued classical training, conservatory, and then I discovered that I really enjoyed improvising, which is not necessarily common for a lot of classical musicians.

So it all just blended well into joining these other bands such as Musk Ox and The Night Watchwhere your creative output is very important to the development and creation of the music. So I consider myself more than just a classical musician, you know?

But you could replace that person with someone else with the same qualifications and it would pretty much work out the same, but with minor variations, of course.

I always wanted to have my own voice and be a creative artist. The cello is just something I had to work hard at to be good enough to express my ideas and articulate them well. In my case, just starting out, I was asked as a kid if I wanted to take piano lessons, but I said I wanted to take cello lessons because it was just something different from the usual and I liked the instrument.

Like, the spirit that they bring to their instruments and the creativity. With Musk Ox and The Night Watch, we have our own unique creative identities, and we have the space to express ourselves. And as much as some people would deny it, I think that what the ear really gravitates towards is a new stimulus.

When I was doing research for this interview, I noticed your EPs. When I saw the EPs, they brought a smile to my face because Album) my band did their first EP years and years ago, I made some special physical copies that had paintings and they were seasonal paintings based on the elements, because I had a bit of an obsession with that sort of thing at the time.

What Spurred you on to make those seasonal EPs? Nathanael: I think at that point, this wasright? There were no smartphones, no social media. I think at that point when I started playing classical and taking it seriously, something about the sound of the classical guitar just evokes that imagery. I grew up on the East Coast of Canada and in a small town, right by the ocean.

So I spent a lot of time in nature. Once I started listening to Empyrium and more of these nature-focused bands with that kind of imagery, it just resonated with me. Which is funny because, years before that I was doing heavy metal Album) and I moved to Ottawa to go to journalism school, because I wanted to be a heavy metal journalist.

What made you want to re-release the album a couple of years later? What made you omit that from the writing process in future works? I think we just decided we wanted our stuff to be instrumental. When I listen back to that first album, even I ask myself why I did that. But yeah, I think the best stuff is more intuitive.

I mean, when we made this last record, we made it almost in response to Woodfall. And that was sort of the end of that old period. Whereas in the earlier days, especially in the first year that I was in the band — which was circa to — it was a lot folkier and a little bit freer in a way, so it had a very different feel to it. Nathanael: I still feel like I may go and do another solo record that maybe builds off of what that first album did. But then again, who knows, maybe that approach will find its way into Musk Ox again.

Raphael: Yeah, we still play some of that old stuff from the first album. I think the most satisfying thing is being able to mix and match some of those older pieces with the newer ones; to have a smattering of songs from all three albums.

Yeah, definitely. The crescendos on that album are incredible. The first two tracks, parts Album) and two, make the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. Raphael: Thanks. So, the question is, what albums connected with you in the same way Inheritance connected with me? Nathanael: Many of them. And then I got the CD and I remember putting it in my Discman with my headphones on, and I was going for a huge walk through the city on a grey day in this trance, and it was just a moment that really resonated with me and it hit me deeply.

So, for me, The Mantle is one of those albums that came into my life. So when I was 17 or 18, I started doing that on my own stuff, and I started doing it as a session musician, doing all of these stacked layers of cello, and it kind of came from that David Darling record, because he was creating these huge, dense chords, and it felt like this wave washing over me.

It was very soothing, but also kind of oppressive in a way too. There are no interviews that I know about, so it just means something to me in a very singular and opaque way.

So yeah, I just find my inspiration from that sort of ilk and find what connects with me the most. Do you not really listen to metal albums then. Are you primarily just into classical? When it comes to listening to music, I tend to get introduced to it by friends or colleagues, and so I take to liking stuff that way. There was a social aspect to it as well. The music has to be on point to subsist and to keep the listener engaged. We have some strong opinions about the quality of people voices.

And for me, often the vocals just ruin it. However, I think it goes either way. The different episodes and the evolution of the narrative, whatever it is, you have to be able to convey something like that with music so that it makes sense to the listener.

Nathanael: I think it depends on the person. And that to me is the ultimate challenge. So with the emotion, we turn towards the lyrics and towards the singer and we use that as the primary focus. But when you take the singer away… like The Night Watch is a good example of that. It has this kind of flexibility about it that I like, where you can really focus on the combinations of the instruments, the arrangement, and giving everyone the spotlight at different points, sort of like passing the baton around.

I find that — I mean, it can be done in any format of music — but I think that lends itself more to this sort of music. Nathanael: Yeah, and I have a lot of thoughts on this, because I listen to so much instrumental music. With The Night Watch, it works really well because I love playing rhythm. I love being in the background and filling in the space as a guitarist. The electric guitar is under-utilised as just a background instrument, it can do so much and fill out so much space. Like, he steps in at just the right moment to paint his part of the room.

To me, progressive metal album with zero shredding — I love that challenge. And even there — the way they perform onstage, obviously Maynard is in the back, not because of that stuff, but for acoustic reasons, but it plays into that circular energy instead of a linear one.

You create that world, right, how is it mixed? Me and Ralph talk a lot about this. You can write the song but how you present it sonically to the listener? With Inheritancewhen we mixed it, we worked so hard on the mix because of how we wanted everything to appear. Raphael: Yeah, it makes a different impression.

So, the question is, what albums connected with you in the same way Inheritance connected with me? Nathanael: Many of them. And then I got the CD and I remember putting it in my Discman with my headphones on, and I was going for a huge walk through the city on a grey day in this trance, and it was just a moment that really resonated with me and it hit me deeply.

So, for me, The Mantle is one of those albums that came into my life. So when I was 17 or 18, I started doing that on my own stuff, and I started doing it as a session musician, doing all of these stacked layers of cello, and it kind of came from that David Darling record, because he was creating these huge, dense chords, and it felt like this wave washing over me. It was very soothing, but also kind of oppressive in a way too. There are no interviews that I know about, so it just means something to me in a very singular and opaque way.

So yeah, I just find my inspiration from that sort of ilk and find what connects with me the most. Do you not really listen to metal albums then. Are you primarily just into classical? When it comes to listening to music, I tend to get introduced to it by friends or colleagues, and so I take to liking stuff that way. There was a social aspect to it as well. The music has to be on point to subsist and to keep the listener engaged.

We have some strong opinions about the quality of people voices. And for me, often the vocals just ruin it. However, I think it goes either way. The different episodes and the evolution of the narrative, whatever it is, you have to be able to convey something like that with music so that it makes sense to the listener.

Nathanael: I think it depends on the person. And that to me is the ultimate challenge. So with the emotion, we turn towards the lyrics and towards the singer and we use that as the primary focus. But when you take the singer away… like The Night Watch is a good example of that. It has this kind of flexibility about it that I like, where you can really focus on the combinations of the instruments, the arrangement, and giving everyone the spotlight at different points, sort of like passing the baton around.

I find that — I mean, it can be done in any format of music — but I think that lends itself more to this sort of music. Nathanael: Yeah, and I have a lot of thoughts on this, because I listen to so much instrumental music. With The Night Watch, it works really well because I love playing rhythm. I love being in the background and filling in the space as a guitarist. The electric guitar is under-utilised as just a background instrument, it can do so much and fill out so much space. Like, he steps in at just the right moment to paint his part of the room.

To me, progressive metal album with zero shredding — I love that challenge. And even there — the way they perform onstage, obviously Maynard is in the back, not because of that stuff, but for acoustic reasons, but it plays into that circular energy instead of a linear one. You create that world, right, how is it mixed? Me and Ralph talk a lot about this. You can write the song but how you present it sonically to the listener?

With Inheritancewhen we mixed it, we worked so hard on the mix because of how we wanted everything Album) appear. Raphael: Yeah, it makes a different impression. You know, the actual strokes are the same, but the brush and the paints are different. Inheritance is out now via bandcampwhere you can find their other works. Click here to cancel reply. Interview: Musk Ox Pt. Oh, did it?

Right, sorry, I thought The Night Watch came first. What made you want to expand on the tracklisting for the re-release? Evan: We also still play those old songs as a trio. Where was the composer from? Raphael: He was from the states. He just died at the beginning of this year, actually. Leave a Response Click here to cancel reply. You need to be logged in to post a comment Login Register.

DrGonzo Elynna This was a great read.

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8 Responses to Agalloch - The Mantle (CD, Album)

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    Feb 22,  · Standard CD Jewel Case 2. Special Edition Digipak (incl. 1 bonus track) 3. g Gatefold 2LP Edition (incl. 1 bonus track, an 8-page-LP-booklet & the entire album on CD) 4. Ltd. Edition Artbook (incl. 1 bonus track, mix with video animations, instrumental mixes & high res files of the album, Agalloch – The Mantle.

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    Sep 06,  · Pt.1 – Premonition Musk Ox are the real deal. Yet, only one month ago I had no prior knowledge of their existence. It was only through Sputnikmusic’s Album of the Month feature that I came to hear of this Canadian trio – their latest album Inheritance had won best album for July which encouraged me to check it brandez.biz short, Inheritance is a truly spellbinding peregrination; a creation.

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    Feb 22,  · Standard CD Jewel Case 2. Special Edition Digipak (incl. 1 bonus track) 3. g Gatefold 2LP Edition (incl. 1 bonus track, an 8-page-LP-booklet & the entire album on CD) 4. Ltd. Edition Artbook (incl. 1 bonus track, mix with video animations, instrumental mixes & high res files of the album, Agalloch – The Mantle.

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